Subwoofers

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Steve May  |  Feb 13, 2019  |  0 comments
Amazon's wireless subwoofer may ape the styling of its Echo speakers but isn’t the chatty type. It does like to throw its weight around, though...
Mark Craven  |  Dec 05, 2015  |  0 comments

When it comes to bass, bigger is generally better. After all, hitting low frequencies at high output requires large drivers able to shift plenty of air, and said  drivers obviously need to be mounted in sizeable boxes. In an ideal world, we'd all have 18in woofers the size of a Smart car.

Adam Rayner  |  Sep 09, 2015  |  0 comments

I've reviewed a few high-end subwoofers recently, but this is a simple and affordable offering that is, in its own way, equally impressive.

Adam Rayner  |  Aug 18, 2015  |  0 comments

Eclipse is the audio side of Japanese automotive technology company Fujitsu Ten. As a speaker brand, it is famous for its egg-shaped single-driver models, the Time Domain series. The design of these premium speakers isn't just for show – its effect upon the internal physics is to reduce back wave disturbance. And a single full-range transducer has no passive crossover, nor tweeter, thus no distortion in that crucial part of our hearing. In these days of bat-frequency super-tweeters there are those who deride the ability of a single driver to reproduce the absolute top tones, saying they are not as bright as designs with separate HF drivers. But then you actually hear the Eclipse speakers and such discussion goes out of the window. It's hilarious to watch someone get their first Time Domain experience; the detail and accuracy literally boggles.

Applying cunning enclosure acoustics and profoundly muscular motors driving very rigid small diaphragms works a treat for most musical frequencies. But bass is different. It requires logarithmically more energy and power to move a thousand times more air than a mid-band/high-frequency transducer. Yet essentially, Eclipse’s approach to bass remains the same. It wants speed and it wants accuracy. 

Ed Shelley  |  Aug 07, 2013  |  0 comments

I first encountered the ForceField3 as part of a complete GoldenEar system last year and it left quite an impression. With 1,000W on tap, the ForceField3 has over twice as much grunt as many of its mid-priced competitors.

Ed Selley  |  Sep 29, 2017  |  0 comments

We seem to be in the middle of a faintly deranged arms race on the subwoofer front at the moment. The challenge of this contest is to see who can direct the largest amount of power at the largest spread of drivers in the smallest overall box (although a separate competition to design the biggest device going is also apparently underway). 

Team HCC  |  Jan 29, 2019  |  0 comments
We all know that home cinema fans appreciate the tactile rumble of low-frequency effects in a movie soundtrack, but just how much of a bass-head are you?
How many subwoofers are in your home cinema system?
Adam Rayner  |  Jul 07, 2016  |  0 comments

JL Audio straddles both the AV and car audio markets, delivering deep bass thrills to those who seek them. On the home cinema side it is best known for its premium-priced, insanely potent Gotham and Fathom subwoofers. This offering, new to the UK and debuted at the Bristol Show, is the company's idea of an entry-level product, and is called Dominion.

Adam Rayner  |  Dec 29, 2010  |  0 comments

Although I’m not as familiar with Paradigm as with some brands, I’ve now heard a bunch of its loudspeakers and have learned one essential thing. It uses lots of cone area in its kit, albeit by slapping lots of midrangers into the towers, or by cramming a 10in woofer into the sort of box most normal people would only use for an 8in.

Ed Selley  |  Aug 14, 2013  |  0 comments

German brand Quadral has been selling in the UK for some years now and its range of technically innovative speakers is designed to be as comfortable in multichannel as they are in stereo, hence the need for dedicated subwoofers. The Qube 10 is one of three new arrivals. 

Adam Rayner  |  Aug 01, 2015  |  0 comments

The 212SE, the newest venture from sub-bass specialist REL, is a mighty quad-driver woofer capable of making profound, structure-borne seismic lows that will flow through walls and foundations. It probably isn't fit for semi-detached suburbia, unless – like me – you have The Best Neighbours Ever.

Ed Selley  |  Aug 19, 2013  |  0 comments
REL Acoustics has been at the business of subwoofers for a very long time and has a slightly different set of design priorities to many other brands. RELs were originally all about giving a bit of low-end shove to your stereo system before ‘home cinema’ was a gleam in Dolby’s eye. To this end, the T-7 is a somewhat different proposition to many of its rivals.
Adam Rayner  |  Jul 29, 2012  |  0 comments

I’ve heard a lot of extraordinary sound in my time. Niagara Falls’ roar, the rumble of the geothermal heat release vent outside Reykjavik, and even a sonic boom from Concorde. All of which is why I adore REL, and the monstrous subwoofers it makes, so much.

Richard Stevenson  |  Nov 05, 2018  |  0 comments
It might come as a surprise that REL has never created a subwoofer purely for movies. Music or ‘music and movies’, yes, but not LFE alone. The £500 HT/1003 is REL’s first foray into pure-bred home cinema heroics.
Richard Stevenson  |  Jan 15, 2019  |  0 comments
REL’s new Serie HT dedicated home cinema subwoofer range gets a big boost with a big brother. We check out the 500W, 12in-driver HT/1205

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