Subwoofers

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Steve Withers  |  Dec 05, 2018  |  0 comments
SVS's PC-4000 subwoofer may look like a giant pedal bin but it has a 16in footprint that won't take up too much space – and a 13.5in driver to craft deep, taut bass...
Steve Withers  |  Sep 13, 2021  |  0 comments
hccbestbuybadgev3How has SVS managed to get so much bass out of a sealed cabinet so compact and so affordable? Steve Withers falls in love with the SB-1000 Pro

Since 1999 American company SVS has built a formidable reputation by mainly focusing on one thing – manufacturing powerful home cinema subwoofers that don't cost the earth. It has some beefy models in its lineup, topping out at the 16-Ultra Series (ported and sealed models with 16in woofers), but the SB-1000 Pro is a timely reminder that amongst the pricier, bigger boom boxes, it can still knock up a compact sealed unit with a sub-£700 ticket. And why wouldn't it? Models like this sell like hot cakes.

Adam Rayner  |  Jul 25, 2013  |  0 comments

SVS was once famed for making subwoofers only for lonely nerds who could get away with standing a bass tube bigger than their girlfriend in the corner of the room. Mostly because they didn’t have a girlfriend. And, while it does still make those bonkers bassmakers, SVS also offers two other forms of woofer – smaller and more cubical large-performance ported items and a series of compact, sealed woofers. The SB-1000 is from the sealed series and is SVS’ idea of as small as any sane person could go, bass-wise.

Mark Craven  |  Jun 30, 2014  |  0 comments

Priced at £650, the SB-2000 is targeted at those eager to sample the delights of serious subwoofer technology without breaking the bank, or rearranging their furniture. A sealed design (SVS has a new ported woofer, too, the PB-2000), the American manufacturer claims it's 'compact'. I'd take that with a pinch of salt – it's not massive, but it's hardly dinky.

Steve Withers  |  Jan 17, 2020  |  0 comments
Is SVS’s new high-excursion 13in driver really ‘an iron fist inside a velvet glove’, and is the SB-3000 worth the £1,250 ticket? Yes, basically
Ed Selley  |  Oct 03, 2018  |  0 comments
SVS's heavy-duty SB-4000 subwoofer partners a large driver and 1,200W amp with intelligent operation. Ed Selley tries his hardest to ruffle its feathers
Ed Selley  |  Aug 30, 2013  |  0 comments

SV Sound (SVS) was a pioneer in the field of direct sales in its native US and carved out a solid reputation for producing no-nonsense designs that punched well above their price point. Initially, it mainly offered cylindrical types, which we've previously likened to giant-sized scratching posts, but more recently the designs have also included more conventional boxes, like the SB12-NSD reviewed here.

Adam Rayner  |  Aug 23, 2012  |  0 comments

There are few audio companies with a history as mighty as Tannoy. Like Xerox and Hoover, this is a brand whose very name became the description of an entire product category. Thus the ding-dong gongs at my holiday hotel were made, as my dad would say, through the ‘Tannoy System’.

Ed Selley  |  Jan 19, 2011  |  0 comments
I love a purist. When I buy kit I want it to be the offering of those obsessive designers, who create trends that get the ultimate kudos of being copied. That’s why I love Velodyne – for its approach and its purity. A company run by utter bass heads.
Mark Craven  |  Dec 03, 2021  |  0 comments
hcchighreccomendThanks to its monster 15in driver, Velodyne Acoustics' new sealed subwoofer gives Mark Craven a taste of the low life

Long-term AV fans will remember Velodyne. Once the go-to for superior, face-melting subwoofers, the American company picked up awards left, right and centre for its range of bassmakers, particularly the flagship DD+ series, which peaked with a terrifying 18in model.

Ed Selley  |  Mar 19, 2012  |  0 comments
You have to love the phrase ‘doing the doof-doofs’. A silly term for describing a clever technical process where a device, either a subwoofer or a system-tuning equaliser, has both voice and ears. The voice makes tone burst sounds that sweep from low to high (and go ‘doof-doof’) and the ears are the microphone, supplied with the Velodyne EQ-Max12 – part of a new range of mid-priced subs from the LFE brand. The Digital Signal Processor inside is a five-band parametric equaliser – and it strives to set the woofer to best suit not just your room, but exactly where you put and point it.
Ed Selley  |  Dec 13, 2011  |  0 comments
Like a wolf in sheep’s clothing Adam Rayner finds that the power behind this sub belies its cute size

If you have a copy of Men in Black II or even Stuart Little II on DVD then you have the 2001-2002 Academy Award-winning animated short, The ChubbChubbs. Its stars are some impossibly cute, fuzzy things that look like ducklings with noses like piglets – yet they turn out to be scary monsters with huge teeth and a terrifyingly large appetite.

Ed Selley  |  Dec 13, 2011  |  0 comments
Wharfedale is one of the UK speaker brands that has been in my awareness for longer than most as it makes stuff that is generally better VFM than just about anyone. And that keen value continues today with this particular line of subs, the PowerCube. This woofer comes in 8in, 10in and 12in flavours and I reckon it’d be brilliant if it also came in a 15in or an 18in, as Wharfedale has packed some lovely stuff in here, but the price is kept low, despite recent increases in the cost of electronics from China.
Ed Selley  |  Dec 29, 2010  |  0 comments
Newish Swedish manufacturer XTZ only sells its subwoofers online in the UK. This practice often means good value, but as you can only audition the kit by paying a deposit for a two-week trial, it has to review well and beat most in its class, irrespective of price.

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