Subwoofers

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Ed Selley  |  Aug 19, 2013  |  0 comments
REL Acoustics has been at the business of subwoofers for a very long time and has a slightly different set of design priorities to many other brands. RELs were originally all about giving a bit of low-end shove to your stereo system before ‘home cinema’ was a gleam in Dolby’s eye. To this end, the T-7 is a somewhat different proposition to many of its rivals.
Adam Rayner  |  Jul 29, 2012  |  0 comments

I’ve heard a lot of extraordinary sound in my time. Niagara Falls’ roar, the rumble of the geothermal heat release vent outside Reykjavik, and even a sonic boom from Concorde. All of which is why I adore REL, and the monstrous subwoofers it makes, so much.

Richard Stevenson  |  Nov 05, 2018  |  0 comments
It might come as a surprise that REL has never created a subwoofer purely for movies. Music or ‘music and movies’, yes, but not LFE alone. The £500 HT/1003 is REL’s first foray into pure-bred home cinema heroics.
Richard Stevenson  |  Jan 15, 2019  |  0 comments
REL’s new Serie HT dedicated home cinema subwoofer range gets a big boost with a big brother. We check out the 500W, 12in-driver HT/1205
Richard Stevenson  |  Jun 07, 2019  |  0 comments
This flagship 15in home cinema subwoofer eschews fancy features in favour of powerful, cinematic LFE.
Richard Stevenson  |  Oct 25, 2017  |  0 comments

Commemorating 25 years of REL sub-bass systems in some style, the company's No.25 is a very special subwoofer and mad as a box of frogs. A really, really big box of frogs, too. Weighing in at a whopping 76kg, its width is close to 75cm, it's over 80cm deep including connectors poking out and it stands 54cm tall. And even if you have a large room to house it, you'll need a big wallet as well. The price? A cool £6,500.

Richard Stevenson  |  Dec 01, 2016  |  0 comments

Here at HCC we rather liked REL’s Serie S subwoofers, even if it has involved repeatedly telling sub-editors that there isn’t an ‘s’ on the end of Serie. When the company announced a Super High Output overhaul of the S/5 and S/3 models we had questions. Could they be better than the original? Would the price remain competitive? Might REL find that lost ‘s’? The answer to the last is 'no', but I'm happy to reply in the affirmative to the first two. 

Steve Withers  |  Jan 22, 2020  |  0 comments
The new Serie S range of subwoofers from REL is 
more than just a simple revision of its previous incarnation. Never a company to do things by half, the new lineup represents a total transformation of its mid-sized class 
of subs. The S/812 tested here (£2,300) tops the upgraded range, which also includes the smaller S/510 (£1,800).
Adam Rayner  |  Aug 15, 2014  |  0 comments

REL makes superb active subwoofers in general and this one is so good, it is peer to at least one 15in model and other products nearly twice the price. In the S5, driver and amplifier engineering have created a new benchmark.

Ed Selley  |  Sep 02, 2011  |  0 comments
Coming up with a natty little subwoofer that can look like a radiator just isn’t SVS’ style. Neither is designing a tiny box with a bonkers amplifier to make it all but explode with power.
Ed Selley  |  Mar 25, 2015  |  0 comments

As a company, SVS has taken the ‘no substitute for cubic capacity’ maxim and flogged it to death. Then flogged it a bit more. The PB-2000 subwoofer is at the affordable end of its portfolio but it is still a huge piece of kit. The PB classification denotes a ported model, so as well as a 12in forward-firing driver, there is a 4in port working on the same axis. Now, no 12in woofer is ever going to be tiny, but at 55cm deep and over 50cm high, the PB-2000 is a bit of a whopper.

Mark Craven  |  Mar 06, 2020  |  0 comments
hccbestbuybadgev3Mark Craven discovers SVS's mid-range ported subwoofer adds an extra layer of enjoyment to heavyweight soundmixes. Cue Ready Player One...

SVS has a settled strategy when it comes to its subwoofer stable: it sells both ported and sealed variants, to give consumers a choice. The smaller sealed models are for those wanting to install a sub in a typical living environment (or, as SVS puts it, 'mixed media' entertainment systems), while the larger ported offerings are for dedicated movie rooms.

Mark Craven  |  Jun 15, 2017  |  0 comments

Bass is a vital part of the home cinema package. Hefty, heaving, humongous low-frequencies are guaranteed to add scale and impact to a surround sound experience, in a way that crystalline high frequencies or robust dialogue just don't. For some AV enthusiasts, their subwoofer is their favourite toy.

Steve Withers  |  Dec 05, 2018  |  0 comments
SVS's PC-4000 subwoofer may look like a giant pedal bin but it has a 16in footprint that won't take up too much space – and a 13.5in driver to craft deep, taut bass...
Adam Rayner  |  Jul 25, 2013  |  0 comments

SVS was once famed for making subwoofers only for lonely nerds who could get away with standing a bass tube bigger than their girlfriend in the corner of the room. Mostly because they didn’t have a girlfriend. And, while it does still make those bonkers bassmakers, SVS also offers two other forms of woofer – smaller and more cubical large-performance ported items and a series of compact, sealed woofers. The SB-1000 is from the sealed series and is SVS’ idea of as small as any sane person could go, bass-wise.

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