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John Archer  |  Aug 27, 2021  |  0 comments
hccbestbuybadgev3Philips' 800 Series OLED TV adds top-drawer gaming to excellent picture quality, discovers John Archer

Philips' ability to harness its potent video processing to the innate precision of OLED display technology has, over the last half-a-decade or so, given the brand a new lease of life, and one that's seen it claim an ever-growing slice of the premium TV market in the face of competition from both established brands and aggressive newcomers. And I can't see it losing its grip if it continues to make TVs like those in its OLED806 range.

John Archer  |  Mar 04, 2013  |  0 comments

While some may have had concerns about Philips' TV business, it's safe to say that things appear firmly on track following its deal with TP Vision. Last issue we marvelled at the pictorial delights – at least in 2D mode – of the brand's latest Moth Eye filter TV, the 46PFL9707. And now we find ourselves face to face with the more value-conscious but still pretty spectacular 55PFL6007.

John Archer  |  Sep 11, 2013  |  0 comments

Philips has long had a reputation in the TV world for going further than most when it comes to video processing. This trend continues with its new 55PFL8008.

John Archer  |  Sep 28, 2017  |  0 comments
Philips’ debut OLED TV, the 55POS901, was a bit of a belter. It combined OLED’s traditional contrast, viewing angle and colour strengths with Philips’ powerful video processing and Ambilight technology to impressive effect. The good news is that by doing things a little differently, the brand’s new 55POS9002 OLED display is even better…
Steve May  |  Feb 07, 2020  |  0 comments
hccbestbuybadgev3With universal HDR support and style to spare, you'll be sorely tempted by this 4K HDR mid-ranger, says Steve May

Philips has thrown everything bar the kitchen sink at its 6 Series high street hotshot. This 4K UHD LED model doesn't just try to woo with a low price tag, it wows with a host of fan-favourite features, including Ambilight, multi-HDR and Amazon Alexa voice support.

John Archer  |  Oct 09, 2015  |  0 comments
It’s taken Philips longer than most to get its 2015 TV range out there, but it arrives with a bang in the shape of the 4K/Ultra HD 55PUT6400. Remarkably, this 55-incher can be had for about £850, despite its native 4K UHD core being joined by Google’s Android Smart TV system and one of Philips' renowned picture processing engines. 
Ed Selley  |  Feb 14, 2011  |  0 comments
A bit of a stretch Philips takes John Archer’s home cinema tastes to breaking point – in a good way – with its latest 21:9-ratio TV

Just as Spinal Tap’s amps go to 11, then Philips’ 58PFL9955H goes to 21. Or 21:9, to be precise. This is the much-anticipated sequel to the brand’s original, ground-breaking and seriously movie-friendly Cinema 21:9 – a TV which laughed in the piffling face of your usual 16:9-ratio TVs and stretched to embrace the extra girth of the ultra-wide CinemaScope aspect ratio still used on the majority of cinematically released films.

John Archer  |  Sep 19, 2018  |  0 comments
Philips' 65OLED903 (also known as OLED+903) sees the brand teaming up with UK sound experts Bowers & Wilkins. The idea is that the latter's sonic knowhow, combined with Philips' picture quality prowess, results in a TV that's a genuine all-rounder, and one that delivers a cinematic experience. The partnership has certainly got off to a good start, with the OLED903 scooping the 'Home Theatre TV' prize in this year's EISA Awards.
John Archer  |  Oct 29, 2020  |  0 comments
hccbestbuybadgev3John Archer auditions Philips' step-up 65OLED935 TV, which aims to add integrated Atmos audio to picture perfect processing

Philips has long understood the importance of video processing to TV performance. It was throwing huge amounts of computational power at LCD TVs when LCD TVs were barely a thing, with typically excellent results (albeit once you'd tinkered with some of the settings). Yet the addition of OLED to its portfolio has seen processing prowess come into its own like never before.

Mark Craven  |  Nov 01, 2019  |  0 comments
hcc_recommendedThis Philips OLED wants to put an end to the notion of mediocre TV audio. Mark Craven reports

Last year, Philips collaborated with Bowers & Wilkins on its OLED903 series, roping in the sound specialist to boost the audio appeal of its 4K display. But it turns out that was merely an aperitif; its new OLED984 is the main course. This time around, B&W has been involved from the very beginning of the project, resulting in a TV that's somewhat different to the rest of the flatscreen market. In a good way.

John Archer  |  Nov 25, 2016  |  0 comments

The more high dynamic range (HDR) displays I’ve seen, the more convinced I’ve become that the only type of LCD TV that can comfortably handle HDR’s extreme light demands are those that use direct rather than edge lighting – ideally in conjunction with some degree of ‘local dimming’, whereby clusters of LEDs have their light output adjusted independently.

Ed Selley  |  Nov 30, 2010  |  0 comments
3D for everyone John Archer is surprised to see a 3DTV for only £1,500, and wonders if there’s a catch

This 46in TV with full HD and frame sequential 3D playback costs just £1,500, not in excess of £2K like every other active 3D TV. In other words, it promises to be the set that brings 3D to the masses. Since it uses a standard CCFL backlight, it’s loads fatter than the wafer-thin delights of Samsung’s edge LED models. But it’s still fairly stylish for all that.

Ed Selley  |  Mar 07, 2011  |  0 comments
Plasma is alive and kicking With a raft of features, including 3D capability, this is yet another superior screen from Samsung. And it's not LED, either. Adrian Justins reports

 

Ed Selley  |  Sep 02, 2011  |  0 comments
Smarter and cheaper 3D plasma If your finances won’t run to Panasonic’s VT30 series, John Archer reckons Samsung’s 51-incher is an affordable way to go Smart

Samsung doesn’t seem to like plasma very much. Every year, the brand’s marketing focuses almost exclusively on its latest LED TVs, while its plasma models sneak into stores with little or no fanfare.

Adrian Justins  |  Nov 14, 2012  |  0 comments

It’s almost impossible to start a plasma TV review without first mentioning the L word. In other words, the seemingly relentless march of LED into the showrooms and living rooms of the nation. If plasma was only just being invented it probably wouldn’t reach production, but thankfully for discerning AV enthusiasts, Samsung, LG and Panasonic have long-established factories that continue to keep cooking on gas.

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