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John Archer  |  Jul 01, 2012  |  0 comments

Kogan is a brand you’ve probably never heard of. Until this 55in LED screen arrived at HCC, we certainly hadn’t. Hailing from Australia, Kogan promises bigscreen pics at bargain prices. This set can be yours for just £750, saving a few hundred quid on the mainstream competitors. However, I’m worried that it proves to be a false economy.

Steve May  |  Jun 21, 2012  |  0 comments

We’re increasingly living in a connected world. Last year, 400 of the world’s 600 million broadband homes deployed home networking technology. By 2015, upwards of 700 million homes will be running local networks. Small wonder then that TV makers have put the pedal to the metal when it comes to making Smart TVs.

Steve May  |  Jun 07, 2012  |  0 comments

The LG DM2350D is a jack-of-all-trades 3D display. A combination Freeview TV and PC monitor, it’s aimed at both 3D gamers and/or those that hanker after a multifunctional screen.

John Archer  |  May 27, 2012  |  0 comments

The first big new TV release of 2012 is here, in the comely shape of Samsung’s UE55ES8000. And if its level of technological advancement and all-round quality is symptomatic of what we might also expect from other brands in the coming weeks and months, then the rest of the year could be pretty special.

John Archer  |  May 08, 2012  |  0 comments

This is yet another 32in LED TV from Toshiba that does the business. Whether specced as the centre-piece of a smallscale surround sound setup or plonked in a second room, it offers a heady mix of thoughtful design, watchable pictures and bonus features. £400 may be more than other 32inchers on the market, but I reckon it’s worthy of the price.

Steve May  |  Apr 23, 2012  |  0 comments

Dixons’ own-brand 3DTV ships with ten pairs of 3D glasses in the box. Unfortunately the quality of a set’s stereoscopy is not proportional to the number of comedy goggles it comes with.

John Archer  |  Apr 18, 2012  |  0 comments

If there was any doubt that Philips is one of the most innovative TV brands at work today, it’s been emphatically eradicated by the first two TVs we’ve seen from the brand’s belated 2011/202 range. First there was the 46PFL9706T, which used its Moth-Eye filter to deliver class-leading black level response. And now we have the 50PFL7956H, otherwise known as the Cinema 21:9 Gold: the brand’s first TV to combine its super-wide, film-friendly 21:9 aspect ratio with passive 3D technology.

Ed Selley  |  Mar 22, 2012  |  0 comments
Superior smallscreen Toshiba’s 32UL863B offers a solid AV performance and a mass of features – Mark Craven wonders whether there’s room in his house for another TV

Toshiba’s flatscreen resurgence continues with this feature-rich 32in LED set. Of course, it lacks the ‘wow’ factor of the CEVO-powered 55in TV reviewed last issue, but this is a brilliantly executed product that will do a job in any small cinema setup or second room. While it’s not the most affordable TV at this size, I reckon the extra outlay is worth it.

Ed Selley  |  Mar 19, 2012  |  0 comments
Moth-eyed magician Philips has turned to the humble moth for inspiration with its latest TV, giving John Archer a new-found respect for our fluttery friends

Philips can usually be depended on to deliver a genuine innovation or two with every new range of TVs. But this year it’s outdone itself by introducing the first commercially-released TV equipped with a Moth Eye filter. The TV in question is the 46PFL9706T. And so unique is it that not even the larger model from the same range, the 52PFL9706T, benefits from the same tech.

Ed Selley  |  Mar 13, 2012  |  0 comments
Samsung's wonderwall Those looking for a monster flatscreen TV that’s more BFI than TOWIE should audition this affordable over-achiever, suggests Steve May

For a cinematic, bigscreen viewing experience a giant plasma is hard to beat. The technology has always had its fans, not least because it’s simply more cinematic than LED LCD TVs. But if you’re on the hunt for a big PDP, one brand that might not spring immediately to mind is Samsung. This isn’t exactly surprising. The LCD market leader tends to treat the technology like the proverbial evil twin locked in the attic. This is undoubtedly a shame.

Ed Selley  |  Jan 12, 2012  |  0 comments
The envelope pushes right back Sony's top-of-the-line 55in HX923 series LED TV is ambitious in terms of design and specification. But that may be a problem, says Steve May

Sony’s KDL-55HX923 is nothing short of spectacular. With a skyscraper-inspired glass frontage and (optional) smart Monolithic Design stand, this TV is certain to attract admiring glances. But there’s more to this thin 3D screen than good looks. Beneath the hood lurks a wealth of picture processing tech, plus a few surprises.

Ed Selley  |  Jan 12, 2012  |  0 comments
Although a certain type of AV enthusiast shudders at the very mention of ‘processing’ in a TV, the reality is that no decent telly can produce good pictures without using at least some processing.
Ed Selley  |  Dec 12, 2011  |  0 comments
3D’s most haunted LG’s 3D-capable plasma rewrites the rule book, says crosstalk ghost-hunter, John Archer. It’s just a pity that in it’s the wrong way...

Ed Selley  |  Dec 12, 2011  |  0 comments
Passive effective has finally arrived LG’s debut Nano technology TV promises unrivalled LED pictures. John Archer discovers if that’s the case

While it’s now established that passive 3D technology is a great, family-friendly alternative to active 3D where 42in and possibly 47in screen sizes are concerned, I personally have had my doubts that LG’s new 3D approach works on bigger screens.

Ed Selley  |  Dec 12, 2011  |  0 comments
Mid-range marvel Sony continues its 3D resurrection with its latest 40in TV, says John Archer

Sony’s EX723 series turned out to be some of the worst 3D performers we’ve seen, but subsequent 3D models have upped the brand’s game. On paper at least, this set looks equipped to do the business. It carries MotionFlow XR 400 processing; a system that combines the detail boosting, noise-reducing qualities of Sony’s new X-Reality picture engine with a 400Hz effect to hopefully kick crosstalk into touch.

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