Televisions

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Adrian Justins  |  Aug 28, 2012  |  0 comments

The 46YL863 is a fine-looking TV, although its heavy-duty stand lacks the coolness of the gorgeous brushed aluminium bezel and designer remote control. It is not, however, a TV for the impatient, taking a good 30 seconds for the blank screen to spring to life after pressing the on button. The interminable wait is possibly the most frustrating aspect of owning this screen as it otherwise generally acquits itself well and shows the importance of Toshiba’s CEVO engine and Active Vision M800HD processing when it comes to delivering HD images.

Ed Selley  |  Dec 12, 2011  |  0 comments
3D’s going Places Toshiba’s 47VL863B is its first passive 3D TV. John Archer finds out if it helps or hinders the passive argument

Ed Selley  |  Mar 07, 2011  |  0 comments
Tosh injects some Jensen good looks The brand pulled out all the stops to make this 55-incher a great HD TV, says Steve May. And then it added 3D...

Toshiba desperately wants a slice of the high-end flatscreen TV market. It’s been trying for years to secure a beachhead, first with its ill-fated SED project and more recently with the first generation Cell TV.

Ed Selley  |  Jan 12, 2012  |  0 comments
Although a certain type of AV enthusiast shudders at the very mention of ‘processing’ in a TV, the reality is that no decent telly can produce good pictures without using at least some processing.
John Archer  |  Oct 12, 2012  |  0 comments

Toshiba’s 55ZL2 rewrites TV history on not one but two fronts, comes fully-loaded with unprecedented amounts of processing power and looks amazing to boot. In other words, it’s the shape of TVs to come. Yet there are a few bumps along the way...

John Archer  |  Jan 30, 2014  |  0 comments

The latest in the new wave of UHD TVs, the Toshiba 65L9363DB, doesn’t get off to the most auspicious of starts, as at £5,500, it’s £500 more expensive than other 65in UHD/4K big-hitters from Samsung and Sony. And, although Panasonic’s L65WT600 is also £5,500, that model sports a cutting-edge HDMI 2.0 port while the 65L9363DB does not. In other words, if it’s going to justify its price, the 65L9363DB will have to perform better than its rivals – and that’s quite a challenge.

John Archer  |  Apr 23, 2014  |  0 comments

This year’s CES electronics expo in Las Vegas was awash with rumours that the prices of mainstream 4K TVs will halve in 2014. I didn’t expect, though, to find these rumours borne out so soon. But here I am, staring goggle-eyed at an 84in 4K TV that can be found selling for just £7,000 – less than half the price of any other 84in 4K TV seen to date.

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