LATEST ADDITIONS

Adam Rayner  |  Sep 02, 2011  |  0 comments

Branding is funny stuff. We expect some gravitas with excellent products – being too flippant about something of high-quality tends to put us Brits right off. There’s been a huge fuss about chavs wearing Burberry and ‘devaluing’ the brand, for instance.

Ed Selley  |  Sep 02, 2011  |  0 comments
Poundstretcher Adrian Justins finds that, with a bit of patient tweaking, this no-frills, 3D-capable plasma acquits itself well

The P42ST30B is the most affordable Panasonic plasma yet to offer viewing in the third dimension, and in terms of both spec and looks, it is the runt of the brand’s 3D plasma range. Its appearance is somewhat unrefined with its grey-green screen, industrial-looking 2in-wide gunmetal grey frame and slab of a pedestal for a stand.The plasticky remote control doesn’t help matters either, but at least the TV is solid enough to withstand knocks and sticky paws.

Ed Selley  |  Sep 02, 2011  |  0 comments
Smarter and cheaper 3D plasma If your finances won’t run to Panasonic’s VT30 series, John Archer reckons Samsung’s 51-incher is an affordable way to go Smart

Samsung doesn’t seem to like plasma very much. Every year, the brand’s marketing focuses almost exclusively on its latest LED TVs, while its plasma models sneak into stores with little or no fanfare.

Ed Selley  |  Sep 02, 2011  |  0 comments
Even smarter 3D With advanced ‘net connectivity, 3D and designer looks, this Samsung LED is a formidable bargain. Steve May reports

Samsung’s 40UED6530 LED puts forward such a convincing case to be crowned Britain’s Best Value 3D LED TV, there really doesn’t seem much point considering anything else.

Ed Selley  |  Sep 02, 2011  |  0 comments
Darkchip diva Can £800 really buy you a quality hi-def home cinema projector? According to bigscreen behemoth John Archer, indeed it can

Usually projectors that cost less than £800 are either aimed at the business/education markets or absolutely rubbish. And there can be no hiding place for shoddiness when you’re watching a picture that’s 100in wide or more.

Ed Selley  |  Sep 02, 2011  |  0 comments
Slimline simplicity Panasonic's slimline 3D Blu-ray system majors on picture and sound quality – but can’t meet the multimedia needs of Adrian Justins

Panasonic’s SC-BTT775 is a multi-talented home cinema beast, offering 3D Blu-ray playback, HDMI switching, a smattering of Smart TV services and a complete 5.1 surround sound system with the option to add extra wireless surround back speakers.

Ed Selley  |  Sep 02, 2011  |  0 comments
Coming up with a natty little subwoofer that can look like a radiator just isn’t SVS’ style. Neither is designing a tiny box with a bonkers amplifier to make it all but explode with power.
Martin Pipe  |  Sep 01, 2011  |  0 comments
To Nfiniti and beyond... Martin Pipe sorts out several different network woes with this device

Buffalo’s WLAE-AG300N works in three ways. The first is to add an additional wi-fi access point if there are ‘black spots’ in your home. Here, an Ethernet cable is run from your router to where the additional coverage is required. In the second mode, two WLAE-AG300Ns act as a wireless ‘bridge’ between two existing wired networks. Finally, there’s the ability to connect non wi-fi devices to a wireless network, by running an Ethernet cable from the WLAE-AG300N to the device.

Ed Selley  |  Sep 01, 2011  |  0 comments
Pack some high vaultage Martin Pipe checks out an upmarket storage tank

Networked-attached storage (NAS) is a speedy, convenient means of backing up data. Modern units, such as the ReadyNAS Ultra 4 featured here, are also capable of streaming any multimedia files stored on them to any Smart device that can accept them. The four drive bays of the heavy and massively-built ReadyNAS Ultra 4 can each accommodate 2TB drives and so a combined total of 8TB is possible – that’s an awful lot of video, photos and music.

Ed Selley  |  Sep 01, 2011  |  0 comments
Get your '3D parties' started Martin Pipe tests 3D spex designed to work across many brands

XpanD has now introduced 3D glasses that can be partnered with infra-red triggered 3D displays from the likes of Panasonic, Samsung, Philips and Toshiba, thereby reducing compatibility issues for 3DTV owners. If you’re going to a 3D party and aren’t sure what (older!) TV you’ll be watching, these XpanD glasses are good bet-hedgers. XpanD will be launching a new range (the X104) with support for Bluetooth as well as the radio system favoured by Panasonic.

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