Loudspeakers

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David Vivian  |  Nov 23, 2018  |  0 comments
As if guided by some mystic force, Q Acoustics, founded a mere decade ago, seems incapable of putting a foot wrong. Be it in its M series soundbars and soundbases or traditional speakers, when it comes to close but no cigar – heroically missing the mark by just a hair – the company is utterly useless. Does this new 5.1 system continue that trend?
Ed Selley  |  Oct 09, 2018  |  0 comments
Having arrived in the affordable speaker market and issued a swift kicking to the established order, things have calmed down a little at Q Acoustics. Its ranges of speakers are now seeing upgrades rather than wholesale changes – a reflection that they ain’t broke and don’t really need fixing. The latest member of the family to receive some attention is the curvaceous 7000i Series, here released in a new bundle referred to as the ‘Slim.’
Ed Selley  |  Apr 12, 2016  |  0 comments
From a late start (2006), Q Acoustics has become one of the major players in affordable loudspeakers. Its policy of using relatively conventional materials in well thought-out speaker designs has earned a lorry-load of awards and a large fanbase. But it's not content to focus only on the budget category...
Mark Craven  |  Apr 15, 2022  |  0 comments
hccbestbuybadgev3Mark Craven believes Q Acoustics' mid-level Concept speaker package was worth waiting for

It was almost a decade ago that Q Acoustics launched its Concept range. At the time, the relatively new UK brand was known for affordable loudspeakers, and the 2013 arrival of the Concept 20 bookshelf was billed as a step toward the high-end. Okay, it was still on the right side of pricey, but later on in 2017 came floorstanders (the Concept 500s) at £4,000 a pair.

Ed Selley  |  Mar 25, 2022  |  0 comments
hccbestbuybadgev3The Brit speaker maker has turned its attention again to compact, powered bookshelf models, and, says Ed Selley, cooked up a bona fide bargain

As well as multiple ranges of conventional passive speakers, Q Acoustics has been involved in making self-contained speaker solutions for most of the time it has been in business since 2006. The new M20 is the replacement for the long-running (but excellent) BT3, which launched in 2014, and takes its place below the more recent, and more sophisticated, Active 200 that we looked at in HCC #319.

Adrian Justins  |  Mar 13, 2012  |  0 comments

About five years ago Armour Home ceased distributing Mission speakers and made the questionable decision to design and produce its own speaker brand. Q Acoustics was born.

Danny Phillips  |  Apr 07, 2014  |  0 comments

Compact speaker systems can be real problem-solvers in small rooms thanks to their size and cosmetic appeal, but their inherent lack of cabinet volume means they’re not always the most commanding performers.

Ed Selley  |  Aug 26, 2011  |  0 comments

Quadral is not a UK household name. The German brand has been in business for nearly 40 years, but has only ever intermittently appeared in this country. Now the manufacturer is making a serious attempt on the UK market with its full range of products, of which the Chromium range is the second most pricey in the sizeable lineup. Tested here is a package comprising the £1,160 Chromium 50 floorstanders, £650 Chromium 30 standmounts, £410 Chromium 10 centre and £475 88DV sub. All parts are available separately.

Adam Rayner  |  Nov 30, 2013  |  0 comments

Regular readers will know that as well as home cinema, I also have a passion for automotive audio and cars in general. In that field, while many admire the exotic Italian offerings from the likes of Lamborghini and Ferrari, there's a similar passion for the German marques. BMW, Mercedes-Benz, Porsche – all are praised for their sheer engineering innovation. And if these speakers are anything to go by, the same national stereotypes could apply equally to home cinema. Quadral may not be as desirable a brand as, say, Italy's Zingali, but I like its attitude. It makes well-built speakers with some neat technical tricks.

Adam Rayner  |  May 02, 2014  |  0 comments

Here’s a deliciously odd one – a subwoofer designed to be mounted on a wall. A 'lifestyle product', I would bet my life that REL's original designer Richard E Lord would never have designed this. However, it is with pleasure that I can suggest that, had he been asked to approve the performance of the Habitat 1, he would have done so.

Adam Rayner  |  Jun 14, 2012  |  0 comments

People in the home cinema industry – manufacturers, PRs and the like – know me for being keen on mad, huge potent audio. Giant 18in subwoofers and speakers the size of Stonehenge. I think they sometimes forget that I am also impressed by the delicate and the clever. So much so, that with this set of skinny tower-style speakers, all housed in an aluminium toothpaste-tube squeezed-out extrusion, I could feel palpable fear from the PR chap as he kept on politely enquiring how I was ‘getting on’ with the Revel Concerta speaker system.

Danny Phillips  |  Jun 22, 2014  |  0 comments

Insane high-end speakers carved from pure unicorn horn by Apollo himself are all well and good if you can afford them, but what about mere mortals with only a meagre budget to play with? Don’t they deserve spectacular sound quality, too?

Adrian Justins  |  May 28, 2015  |  0 comments

The WAM750, or M7 to give it its stage name, is one of Samsung’s Shape range, powered by Qualcomm’s AllPlay Wi-Fi platform. It can also receive tunes over Bluetooth and has an NFC button which allows your mates to instantly subject you to their favourite tunes stored on their NFC- equipped smartphones. But Bluetooth can’t be used to send audio to other M7s (or the smaller M3 and M5 speakers for that matter) located around the house; only Wi-Fi can.

Adrian Justins  |  Jun 16, 2015  |  0 comments

When it comes to wireless audio streaming Sonos sets the benchmark. The company has been the top multiroom dog for over a decade thanks to its consistently good products and ease of use. But there are some aspects of the Sonos system that warrant improvement, including a lack of DLNA support.

Adrian Justins  |  Mar 08, 2014  |  0 comments

Sonos has been one of the top dogs in wireless audio for some time, where its stylish Play:3 and Play:5 speakers lend themselves perfectly to multiroom use. The beauty of Sonos’s proprietary system is that you can have as many speakers as you like running simultaneously and are restricted only by the range and bandwidth of your network. Being able to pick and choose at random where you want to listen to music stored on a computer, smartphone or tablet is liberating.

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