LATEST ADDITIONS

Ed Selley  |  Jun 17, 2011  |  0 comments
Flat HD fun Despite not offering 3D pictures, Mark Craven finds a lot to like about Panasonic's newest LED TV

Ask any AV enthusiast to recommend a plasma TV and they’ll invariably mention Panasonic. The same isn’t always true of LED TVs, though – something the PDP giant will hope to change with its new 2011 range of LED sets.

Ed Selley  |  Jun 17, 2011  |  0 comments
When I’m streaming Windows Replace your media player with a PC, says Chris Jenkins

The popularity of video downloading means that media players are becoming increasingly essential, even if your PC media source is in another room. But what if the PC is small enough to tuck under your TV? Enter Acer’s super-compact Revo 100.

Ed Selley  |  Jun 17, 2011  |  0 comments
Passive resistance With the LW550 series, LG continues its quest to promote passive 3D. Chris Jenkins asks if this LED Smart set is the way to go

Up until now, most of the marketing activity for 3D has been based around active systems, which require expensive (c. £100 per pair) LCD-shutter glasses which need charging, and can have issues with synchronisation to the 3D frame-switching signal.

Ed Selley  |  Jun 17, 2011  |  0 comments
Faster than a speeding bullet... Chris Jenkins tests out the zippiest external Blu-ray burner on the market

While a Blu-ray/HDD recorder can cost you around £400, if you have a laptop, it may make more sense to add an external Blu-ray burner to it at half the cost. Buffalo’s 12X external drive is ideal.

Ed Selley  |  Jun 17, 2011  |  0 comments
Looking Sharp It may lack some essentials, but this 37-incher has an understated appeal, says Steve May

The LC-37LE320 is an LED flatscreen that takes its design cues, if not its picture technology, from Sharp’s high-end Quattron TV range. These panels squeezed a fourth pixel from the usual RGB array, and the yellow pixel’s arrival certainly led to a significant step up in performance.

Anton van Beek  |  Jun 16, 2011  |  0 comments

It was hailed as a milestone in history of videogame development and a new era for interactive entertainment in the run up to its release. But now that L.A. Noire has finally arrived on shop shelves, does Rockstar Games' latest blockbuster live up to the pre-release hype? And does the game really get us any closer to the arrival of the long-fabled interactive movie?

Anton van Beek  |  Jun 14, 2011  |  0 comments

The high-speed thrills provided by motor sports have been a popular subject for videogame designers since the birth of the industry, with games like Namco's Pole Position and Micromega's 3D Death Chase showcasing what could be achieved on even the most basic hardware. The technological grunt of today's consoles ensures that driving games are more exciting and realistic than ever before, and they don't come much better than Codemasters' DiRT3.

Anton van Beek  |  Jun 13, 2011  |  0 comments

Paul sees Shaun of the Dead and Hot Fuzz co-stars Simon Pegg and Nick Frost making the trip across the Atlantic for an amiable sci-fi comedy about two geeky Brits on a road-trip around America’s UFO hotspots who bump into a real-life extra-terrestrial (voiced by Seth Rogen).

Anton van Beek  |  Jun 13, 2011  |  0 comments

True Grit represents another notch on the belt for filmmaking brothers Joel and Ethan Coen, marking a return to the pinnacle of contemporary American filmmakers after the rather sleight Burn After Reading and A Serious Man.

Anton van Beek  |  Jun 10, 2011  |  0 comments

Once Upon a Time in the West isn’t just one of the greatest westerns – it’s one of the greatest films ever made. Working with the backing of a major American studio and scripted by two young Italian film critics who would eventually become respected filmmakers in their own right (Dario Argento and Bernardo Bertolucci), Leone’s film felt like the summation of the many themes he had begun exploring in his Dollars Trilogy. What initially appears to be a simple tale of revenge soon transforms into an operatic contemplation of the myth and legend of the Wild West with a cast to die for, spectacular images you could frame and hang in a gallery and Ennio Morricone’s greatest score. Cinema doesn’t get much better than this.

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