Adrian Justins

Sort By: Post Date | Title | Publish Date
Adrian Justins  |  Nov 20, 2015  |  0 comments

All soundbases pretend they're ready for the task of doubling up as a plinth for your flatscreen TV, yet some tend to be quite narrow, making them inelegant – and sometimes impractical – partners for larger-sized screens. The introduction of Canton's lengthy DM100 is therefore a welcome move.

Adrian Justins  |  Oct 01, 2015  |  0 comments

BT Sport Ultra HD has left me giddy. Ten years ago I wandered into the Tokyo equivalent of Currys and saw an HD broadcast for the first time. The clarity blew my mind and I’ve never forgotten the moment. Since then nothing that’s been broadcast has had the same impact. That all changed when the Humax DTR-T4000 turned up, the UK's first set-top box to cater for 4K TV owners, as part of the BT TV ecosystem.

Adrian Justins  |  Sep 03, 2015  |  0 comments

The country that gave us democracy, philosophy and, er, ouzo may be in an economic jam but Greece isn’t finished yet. Native brand Crystal Acoustics has what it hopes is a major contribution to home cinema in the form of WiSound. Developed in conjunction with boffins at the University of Patras, this tech claims to up the ante for audio from a single-box product.

Adrian Justins  |  Jun 16, 2015  |  0 comments

When it comes to wireless audio streaming Sonos sets the benchmark. The company has been the top multiroom dog for over a decade thanks to its consistently good products and ease of use. But there are some aspects of the Sonos system that warrant improvement, including a lack of DLNA support.

Adrian Justins  |  Jun 08, 2015  |  0 comments

Pure’s Jongo system is similar to Samsung’s Shape in that it features both Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, but the latter is restricted to single-speaker streaming by Samsung, whereas Pure’s so-called Caskeid Bluetooth can help create a multiroom wireless network. Caskeid is not aptX standard but Pure claims that it does offer the lowest latency of any multiroom system. Arguably of more importance is that without Bluetooth you wouldn’t be able to stream from subscription services such as Spotify, Deezer and Google Play. You would, of course, be able to access Pure’s own online subscription service called Pure Connect, plus music stored on the playback device (tablet or smartphone)and DLNA-connected devices.

Adrian Justins  |  Jun 02, 2015  |  0 comments

Bose is a relative newcomer to the multiroom lark, but as ever it likes to do things a little differently. Its SoundTouch range uses bog-standard 802.11 b/g Wi-Fi to operate but it manages to be simultaneously more versatile and less convenient than the likes of Sonos and Pure. More versatile in that its speakers have handy (and rather impressive) OLED display windows and physical remote controls to complement the smartphone and desktop apps, but less convenient in that its range of online streaming services is pitifully small.

Adrian Justins  |  May 28, 2015  |  0 comments

The WAM750, or M7 to give it its stage name, is one of Samsung’s Shape range, powered by Qualcomm’s AllPlay Wi-Fi platform. It can also receive tunes over Bluetooth and has an NFC button which allows your mates to instantly subject you to their favourite tunes stored on their NFC- equipped smartphones. But Bluetooth can’t be used to send audio to other M7s (or the smaller M3 and M5 speakers for that matter) located around the house; only Wi-Fi can.

Adrian Justins  |  May 27, 2015  |  0 comments

Promising an easy way to transmit Full HD video signals around your house using existing mains power lines, Marmitek's HDTV Anywhere consists of a rather dull-looking transmitter and receiver, each of which have an HDMI output. The transmitter has two HDMI inputs.

Adrian Justins  |  May 23, 2015  |  0 comments

Audio Pro takes the rather unfashionable decision and eschews Wi-Fi for its Living Series of multiroom stereo speakers in favour of a dedicated proprietary protocol RF network. It’s by no means an antediluvian approach, as RF has distinct benefits including a maximum (line of sight) wireless range of around 100m, although this is reduced to around 20m from one room to another because of physical barriers such as walls, sofas, large pets, etc.

Adrian Justins  |  May 02, 2015  |  0 comments

Calling the sound that comes out of a regular soundbar 'surround sound' is like saying that watching the World Cup on TV is the same as being in the stadium. But, judging from marketing literature, it's a good selling feature.

Pages

X