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John Archer  |  Apr 18, 2012  |  0 comments

If there was any doubt that Philips is one of the most innovative TV brands at work today, it’s been emphatically eradicated by the first two TVs we’ve seen from the brand’s belated 2011/202 range. First there was the 46PFL9706T, which used its Moth-Eye filter to deliver class-leading black level response. And now we have the 50PFL7956H, otherwise known as the Cinema 21:9 Gold: the brand’s first TV to combine its super-wide, film-friendly 21:9 aspect ratio with passive 3D technology.

Ed Selley  |  Mar 22, 2012  |  0 comments
Superior smallscreen Toshiba’s 32UL863B offers a solid AV performance and a mass of features – Mark Craven wonders whether there’s room in his house for another TV

Toshiba’s flatscreen resurgence continues with this feature-rich 32in LED set. Of course, it lacks the ‘wow’ factor of the CEVO-powered 55in TV reviewed last issue, but this is a brilliantly executed product that will do a job in any small cinema setup or second room. While it’s not the most affordable TV at this size, I reckon the extra outlay is worth it.

Ed Selley  |  Mar 19, 2012  |  0 comments
Moth-eyed magician Philips has turned to the humble moth for inspiration with its latest TV, giving John Archer a new-found respect for our fluttery friends

Philips can usually be depended on to deliver a genuine innovation or two with every new range of TVs. But this year it’s outdone itself by introducing the first commercially-released TV equipped with a Moth Eye filter. The TV in question is the 46PFL9706T. And so unique is it that not even the larger model from the same range, the 52PFL9706T, benefits from the same tech.

Ed Selley  |  Mar 13, 2012  |  0 comments
Samsung's wonderwall Those looking for a monster flatscreen TV that’s more BFI than TOWIE should audition this affordable over-achiever, suggests Steve May

For a cinematic, bigscreen viewing experience a giant plasma is hard to beat. The technology has always had its fans, not least because it’s simply more cinematic than LED LCD TVs. But if you’re on the hunt for a big PDP, one brand that might not spring immediately to mind is Samsung. This isn’t exactly surprising. The LCD market leader tends to treat the technology like the proverbial evil twin locked in the attic. This is undoubtedly a shame.

Ed Selley  |  Jan 12, 2012  |  0 comments
The envelope pushes right back Sony's top-of-the-line 55in HX923 series LED TV is ambitious in terms of design and specification. But that may be a problem, says Steve May

Sony’s KDL-55HX923 is nothing short of spectacular. With a skyscraper-inspired glass frontage and (optional) smart Monolithic Design stand, this TV is certain to attract admiring glances. But there’s more to this thin 3D screen than good looks. Beneath the hood lurks a wealth of picture processing tech, plus a few surprises.

Ed Selley  |  Jan 12, 2012  |  0 comments
Although a certain type of AV enthusiast shudders at the very mention of ‘processing’ in a TV, the reality is that no decent telly can produce good pictures without using at least some processing.
Ed Selley  |  Dec 12, 2011  |  0 comments
3D’s most haunted LG’s 3D-capable plasma rewrites the rule book, says crosstalk ghost-hunter, John Archer. It’s just a pity that in it’s the wrong way...

Ed Selley  |  Dec 12, 2011  |  0 comments
Passive effective has finally arrived LG’s debut Nano technology TV promises unrivalled LED pictures. John Archer discovers if that’s the case

While it’s now established that passive 3D technology is a great, family-friendly alternative to active 3D where 42in and possibly 47in screen sizes are concerned, I personally have had my doubts that LG’s new 3D approach works on bigger screens.

Ed Selley  |  Dec 12, 2011  |  0 comments
Mid-range marvel Sony continues its 3D resurrection with its latest 40in TV, says John Archer

Sony’s EX723 series turned out to be some of the worst 3D performers we’ve seen, but subsequent 3D models have upped the brand’s game. On paper at least, this set looks equipped to do the business. It carries MotionFlow XR 400 processing; a system that combines the detail boosting, noise-reducing qualities of Sony’s new X-Reality picture engine with a 400Hz effect to hopefully kick crosstalk into touch.

Ed Selley  |  Dec 12, 2011  |  0 comments
3D’s going Places Toshiba’s 47VL863B is its first passive 3D TV. John Archer finds out if it helps or hinders the passive argument

John Archer  |  Dec 12, 2011  |  0 comments

As Forrest Gump so very nearly said, Loewe is like a box of chocolates; you never know what you’re going to get. Thanks to the German luxury brand’s unique ‘consumer choice’ approach to design, it’s impossible for a reviewer to predict for sure what colour TV is going to emerge from the box, with which speaker options, or design of stand.

Ed Selley  |  Oct 30, 2011  |  0 comments
Ultimate plasma Hallelujah! Panasonic has super-sized its high-end NeoPlasma display. Steve May basks before the glory of a 65in VT30

Size does matter. Both my wife and the Swedish au pair tell me this constantly, particularly when it comes to our home cinema.

Ed Selley  |  Oct 30, 2011  |  0 comments
Do-it-all screen for 3D film fans Steve May checks out a mini version of Samsung’s high-end LED TVs

Samsung’s Series 9 TA950 drew big crowds when it was first unveiled at the 2011 CES. A hybrid 32in Freeview HD 3D TV and PC monitor, it’s a leading-edge screen for your desktop that offers all the functions of the brand’s high-end LED TVs. The design is inspired, with a panel that’s effectively suspended above its pedestal via a swooping right-hand bracket. This tilts backwards for a relaxed viewing position. Slimline 7W stereo speakers fire forwards from the front of the super-thin pedestal, while inputs are ranged along the rear. Just as on the brand’s regular TVs, the TA950 sports Samsung’s Smart Hub apps and IPTV portal, home to the BBC iPlayer YouTube, LOVEFiLM and the new and exclusive Explore 3D content channel.

Ed Selley  |  Oct 30, 2011  |  0 comments
Sharp follows the yellow-rich road The brand’s latest offering combines much-improved 3D talents with ‘four-colour’ technology to startlingly good effect, says John Archer

Despite the best efforts of a lab-coated George Takei in Sharp’s ‘Quattron’ TV ad campaign, the brand’s unique four-colour technology hasn’t fired the imagination of Joe Public as much as was hoped.

Ed Selley  |  Oct 30, 2011  |  0 comments
Slim pickings Toshiba's 42RL853 is tailor-made for the mainstream, says Steve May. But that doesn't preclude a few surprises

Earlier this year, Toshiba announced a slew of upmarket 3D-ready TVs. Dressed in togas, and liberally invoking the god Bacchus, the brand’s senior executives took over the Italian film set used to make Rome, the BBC/HBO co-production, and proclaimed that a legion of advanced tellyboxes brandishing the banner of its new Toshiba Places online portal, would march on the combined rival armies.

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